2nd Battalion

The Yorkshire Regiment

2nd Battalion

2 YORKS

By Lt Col Sam Humphris MBE

As the departing Commanding Officer, I would like to formally recognise how inspiringly powerful a thing a Battalion is and how it can achieve almost anything when its people each own and dominate their battlespace.  It makes me incredibly proud to have led 2 YORKS on operations in 2018.  Whilst the lethality of attacks in Kabul has increased, a constant in our tenure was the professionalism and precision of our Yorkshire soldiers.  They absolutely set the standard in the City, both in their day-to-day business of protecting the high tempo train, advise and assist mission; but also when they were required to respond to attacks.  Each sub-unit, including the Echelon, either responded to violence, or has been the victim of violence and on every occasion, our soldiers have been immaculate in the discharge of their duties.  As a result, we have saved many lives and made safe many others; and those tallies will be but two of the Battalion's impressive legacies to the mission, after we transferred authority in April.

Striving for excellence is a journey without end, but my part in this Battalion continuum will end with Operation TORAL 5.  It is impossible not to be impressed by the incredible and remarkable things that 2 YORKS have achieved.  Since the unit move from Cyprus to Catterick in 2015, they have won Gold on both attempts at Cambrian Patrol, won the Army's Equipment Care prize every year and won every single training serial and battle, whether that be during conversion to Light Mechanised Infantry, four CT3 events, Ex WESSEX STORM (CT4), the European Union Battlegroup LIVEX (CT5) or Mission Specific Training.  They have never lost.  They held triple readiness immaculately - all of it high profile and all of it at high readiness and they have been deployed on two UK operations to deliver flood relief.  For their significant efforts they were awarded the Pride of Yorkshire award in 2017 and the York and District medal in 2016. 

The recovery from operations and the next year looks equally replete with opportunity for the Battalion.  The battalion is back from leave and about to reform for Op RESET – an ambitious and seriously exciting attempt to get almost the whole Battalion away on overseas sports and oxygen-rich events at the same time with sports teams in 13 different countries.  After that and a period of readiness as the UK Standby Battalion, we will regrow our intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and support weapons capabilities and then, on current plans, deploy to Morocco at the end of 2018, ahead of CT4 validation in early 2019. 

Finally, can I offer a warm Yorkshire welcome to Lt Col Ben Westcott who assumed command on 2 May.

 

 

Our Capabilities

Foxhound

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Foxhound

The Foxhound is at the cutting edge of protected patrol vehicle technology and provides unprecedented levels of blast protection for its size and weight. These patrol vehicles underwent final testing in the dusty and hot conditions of the Helmand desert before being deployed on operations.

Foxhound has been specifically designed and built in Britain to protect against the threats faced by troops in Afghanistan. However, this is an agile and versatile vehicle that will be a mainstay in the Army for years to come.

Being lighter and smaller than other protected vehicles such as Mastiff and Ridgeback, Foxhound brings a whole new capability to the Army and is ideal for soldiers operating in mentoring and partnering roles.

Foxhound has a top speed of 70mph but can still protect against improvised explosive devices thanks to its v-shaped hull.

WMIK Landrover

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WMIK Landrover

Weapons Mounted Installation Kit Landrover used by 2 YORKS.  Crew of 3 and armed with a 7.62mm nachine Gun, smoke dischargers and with a max speed of 52kph

General Purpose Machine Gun (GPMG)

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General Purpose Machine Gun (GPMG)

The L7A2 General Purpose Machine Gun (GPMG) is a 7.62 x 51mm belt-fed general purpose machine gun which can be used as a light weapon and in a sustained fire (SF) role.

In the SF role, mounted on a tripod and fitted with the C2 optical sight, it is fired by a two-man team who are grouped in a specialist Machine Gun Platoon to provide battalion-level fire support. In SF mode, the GPMG, with a two-man crew, lays down 750 rounds-per-minute at ranges up to 1800 metres.

The GPMG can be carried by foot soldiers and employed as a light machine gun (LMG), although it has largely been replaced by the lighter 5.56 x 45mm Minimi in this role, in most regiments. A fold-out bipod is used to support the GPMG in the LMG role.

Versions of the GPMG are mounted on most Army vehicles and some helicopters.

Husky

Husky is a protected support vehicle, providing a highly mobile and flexible load carrying vehicle.

The Husky has been designed for a range of missions in Afghanistan, including transporting food, water and ammunition, and acting as a command vehicle at headquarters.

Equipped with a machine gun, Husky joins its sister vehicles Wolfhound and Coyote as part of the tactical support vehicle programme. Some vehicles are fitted out as specialised recovery vehicles or fitted with a heavy machine gun or grenade machine gun.

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